Minerals and their impact on height growth

Achieving optimal height growth is a goal many individuals aspire to, and it all begins with understanding the critical role that nutrition plays in this journey. Your body is like a finely tuned machine, and to ensure it reaches its maximum height potential, you must provide it with the right fuel, especially minerals that are particularly beneficial for bone development. These essential minerals, such as Calcium, Zinc, Magnesium, and Phosphorus, are the building blocks of a robust and resilient skeletal structure.

Calcium (Ca)

Calcium is the most abundant element in the human body, found mostly in bones and teeth and just more than 1% in blood and cells. This mineral takes responsibility for maintaining the body's functions. It is also the most important component of the skeleton, making up 70% of bone structure. To increase the length and width of bones, an adequate amount of Calcium must be provided to your body.

Calcium-rich-foods

 

The allocation of Calcium for each age group is described as follows.

  • 0 - 6 months old: 200 mg/day
  • 7 - 12 months old: 260 mg/day
  • 1 - 3 years old: 700 mg/day
  • 4 - 8 years old: 1,000 mg/day
  • 9 - 13 years old: 1,300 mg/day
  • 14 - 18 years old: 1,300 mg/day
  • 19 - 50 years old: 1,000 mg/day
  • 51 - 70 years old: 1,000 mg/day
  • Over 70 years old: 1,200 mg/day

To provide enough Calcium for bones, we should eat foods rich in Calcium regularly such as shrimp, fish, crabs, spinach, cabbage, yogurt, and cereals.

Zinc (Zn)

Despite not constituting as a large proportion as Calcium, Zinc is also present in bone structure and helps bones stronger and healthier. Besides, this mineral increases protein synthesis, cell division, and appetite, and therefore stimulates the natural growth of the body. Zinc deficiency is the leading reason hindering cell division and causing bone growth disorder, thus leading to no or little height gain, delayed puberty, and reduction of sexual functions.

Zinc-rich-foods

The demand for Zinc for each age group is as follows.

  • Newborns 0 - 6 months old: 2 mg/day
  • Newborns 7 - 11 months old: 3 mg/day
  • Children 1 - 3 years old: 3 mg/day
  • Children 4 - 8 years old: 5 mg/day
  • Children 9 - 13 years old: 8 mg/day
  • Males aged 14 and above 11 mg/day
  • Females 14 - 18 years old: 9 mg/day
  • Females aged 19 and above: 8 mg/day
  • Pregnant women aged 18 and above: 11 - 12 mg/day
  • Breastfeeding women aged 18 and above: 12 - 13 mg/day

Foods high in Zinc are chicken, pork, shrimp, crabs, beef, and oysters.

Magnesium (Mg)

Magnesium plays a vital part in the human body. In a 70-kilogram person, it represents 25 – 30 mg, of which 70% is found in bones, 29% in tissues and muscle, and 1% in blood. It also constitutes the bone structure and regulates the excretion of calcitonin, a hormone considered “the leader” of blood Calcium level, to enhance Calcium absorption in intestines, support bone transformation, and boost the immune system for the prevention of bone and joint illnesses. Therefore, if you want to have a healthy skeleton, don’t forget to supplement this kind of mineral every day.

The demand for Magnesium increases along with each age group:

  • For children, the amount of Magnesium increases depending on their age:

              - 6 months old: 30 mg/day

              - 1 - 3 years old: 80 mg/day

              - 9 - 13 years old: 120 mg/day

  • Adults need about 350 – 400 mg/day. For people doing heavy physical activities and athletes, this amount is 1.5 - 2 times as much as that quantity. 

We can supplement this mineral by eating foods, like katuk, mustard greens, Malabar spinach, some types of herbs, meat, milk, millet, soybeans, peanuts, green peas, bananas, avocados, and dried apricots.

Phosphorus (P)

In the skeleton, Phosphorus assures the firmness of bones and creates the strength of muscle. Together with Calcium, Phosphorus makes your bones stronger and healthier, creates the most favorable condition for bone growth, and then boosts your height growth maximally.

Phosphorus-rich-foods

 

Each age group has its demand for Phosphorus as follows:

  • Children 0 - 6 months old: 100 mg/day
  • Children 7 - 12 months old: 275 mg/day
  • Children 1 - 3 years old: 460 mg/day
  • Children 4 - 8 years old 500 mg/day
  • Children 9 - 18 years old: 1,250 mg/day
  • Adults above 19 years old: 700 mg/day

Some foods rich in Phosphorus are meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, nuts and seeds, and beans.

Copper (Cu)

Copper plays a pivotal role in collagen formation, a process that's integral to your bone health and overall growth. Collagen is the primary protein in our connective tissues, including bones, cartilage, and tendons.

Copper also plays a pivotal role in collagen formation, a process that is integral to your bone health and overall growth. Collagen is the primary protein in our connective tissues, including bones, cartilage, and tendons.

Each age group has its demand for Copper as follows:

  • Children 0 - 6 months old: 200 - 220 mg/day
  • Children 7 - 12 months old: 220 - 340 mg/day
  • Children 1 - 3 years old: 340 mg/day
  • Children 4 - 8 years old 440 - 700 mg/day
  • Children 9 - 18 years old: 700 - 890 mg/day
  • Adults above 19 years old: 900 mg/day

To add Copper to your daily diet, try to consume some foods, like seafood, nuts and seeds, organ meats, dark leaf greens, whole grains, and chocolate.

Iron (Fe)

Iron is essential for height development because it facilitates the delivery of oxygen to your bones, muscles, and organs. Oxygen is a vital component in the cellular processes that drive growth and development.

Each age group has its demand for Iron as follows:

  • Children 0 - 6 months old: 0.27 mg/day
  • Children 7 - 12 months old: 11 mg/day
  • Children 1 - 3 years old: 7 mg/day
  • Children 4 - 8 years old 10 mg/day
  • Children 9 - 13 years old: 8 mg/day
  • Adolescent boys 14 - 18 years old: 11 mg/day
  • Adolescent girls 14 - 18 years old: 15 mg/day
  • Adult men 19 years old and above: 8 mg/day
  • Adult women 19 - 50 years old: 18 mg/day
  • Adult women 51 years old and above: 8 mg/day

Some foods rich in Iron are lean meats, beans and lentils, dark leafy greens, fortified cereals, dried fruits, nuts, and seeds.

In sum,

In essence, the pursuit of increasing your height to its maximum potential is an intricate and captivating journey, illuminated by the nuanced impact of vital minerals. While calcium may take the spotlight, there is a symphony of other minerals, including zinc, copper, magnesium, and more, working tirelessly in the background, ensuring that your growth potential is fully realized.

It's important to recognize that the road to attaining your ultimate height is not solely dependent on these minerals. Rather, it is a holistic expedition that encompasses a well-rounded diet, proper hydration, regular physical activity, and adequate sleep. Embrace the profound understanding that nutrition and lifestyle choices are pivotal factors in nurturing your physical stature.

Unlocking your body's innate potential for growth is not merely a matter of chance or genetics; it's a harmonious interplay of biological processes and personal choices. As you embark on this remarkable journey towards optimizing your height, remember that each facet of your lifestyle and nutritional intake contributes to the grand tapestry of your growth story. Your body is a masterpiece, and with the right care and attention, you can sculpt it to reach new heights, both literally and figuratively. So, embrace the wonder of this journey, for it holds the promise of a taller, healthier, and more confident you.

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